Assertion styles

Two different styles of assertion -- chained and block -- are supported for different use-cases. You can mix and match both in the same test and even nest chained assertions inside block assertions.

Chained assertions

Chained assertions use a fluent API similar to AssertJ. They fail fast. That is, the first assertion that fails breaks the chain and further assertions are not evaluated.

Each assertion in the chain returns an Assertion.Builder object that supports further assertions.

val subject = "fnord"
expectThat(subject)
  .isA<String>()
  .hasLength(1)
  .isUpperCase()

Produces the output:

▼ Expect that "fnord":
  ✓ is an instance of java.lang.String
  ✗ has length 1 : found 5

Notice that the isUpperCase() assertion is not applied as the earlier hasLength(1) assertion failed.

Block assertions

Block assertions are declared in a lambda whose receiver is an Assertion.Builder<T> object. They allow multiple assertions (or assertion chains) to be evaluated against the subject.

Block assertions do not fail fast. That is, all assertions in the block are evaluated and the result of the "compound" assertion will include results for all the assertions made in the block.

val subject = "fnord"
expectThat(subject) {
  isA<String>()
  hasLength(1)
  isUpperCase()
}

Produces the output:

▼ Expect that "fnord":
  ✓ is an instance of java.lang.String
  ✗ has length 1 : found 5
  ✗ is upper case

All assertions are applied and since two fail there are two errors logged.

Chained assertions inside block assertions

Chained assertions inside a block will still fail fast but will not prevent other assertions in the block from being evaluated.

val subject = 1L
expectThat(subject) {
  isLessThan(1L).isA<Int>()
  isGreaterThan(1L)
}

Produces the output:

▼ Expect that 1:
  ✗ is less than 1
  ✗ is greater than 1

Note the isA<Int> assertion (that would have failed) was not evaluated since it was chained after lessThan(1) which failed. The greaterThan(1) assertion was evaluated since it was not part of the same chain.

Assertions with multiple subjects

As well as expectThat Strikt provides a top-level expect method that just takes a lambda parameter. Inside the expect block you use that to define a subject and start a chain or nested block of assertions.

All assertions inside the expect lambda are evaluated.

The previous examples can be combined into a single expect block.

expect {
  that("fnord")
    .isA<String>()
    .hasLength(1)
    .isUpperCase()
  that(1L) {
    isLessThan(1L).isA<Int>()
    isGreaterThan(1L)
  }
}